G8 Muskoka Declaration: Recovery and New Beginnings, Canada, 26 June 2010

Sectors : Transparency and accountability, Economic governance and public finance management, Peace-building and peacekeeping, Quality of aid, International partnerships and support for Pan-African institutions, International trade: market access, subsidies and aid for trade, Food security, Disaster risk reduction and reconstruction, General health and health funding, Maternal health, reproductive health and infant mortality, HIV/AIDS, Polio, Climate change technology and research, Mitigation and low carbon growth, Energy
Organisation : G8
Date made: 
2010
Level: 
Heads Of State

Commitments in: Governance - Transparency and accountability

“1. We, the Leaders of the Group of Eight, met in Muskoka on June 25-26, 2010. Our annual summit takes place as the world begins a fragile recovery from the greatest economic crisis in generations....


...4. Moreover, and beginning at the 2008 Hokkaido Toyako Summit, we have recognized the importance of demonstrating that the G8 is committed to reporting transparently and consistently on the implementation of its commitments. In 2009 at the L’Aquila Summit, we tasked senior officials to report on the implementation of our development and development-related commitments with a focus on results. We welcome the Muskoka Accountability Report: Assessing action and results against development-related commitments and will ensure follow up on its conclusions and recommendations. It shows that important progress has been made in many areas, but more needs to be done. We emphasize the importance of regular reports on the progress made in implementing our commitments and in this regard will focus the Accountability reporting in 2011 on health and food security.”
 

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Financing for Development - Quality of aid

“6. Support for development, based on mutual responsibility, and a strong partnership with developing countries, particularly in Africa, remains a cornerstone of the G8’s approach. We will pursue our comprehensive approach to development aiming at sustainable outcomes. We reaffirm our commitments, including on ODA and enhancing aid effectiveness. We call on developing country governments to meet their primary responsibilities for social and economic development and good governance, in the interests of their citizens. Since the most vulnerable states have made the least progress towards the MDGs, we will place special emphasis on helping them build the foundations for peace, security and sustainable development”.

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Development partnerships - International partnerships and support for Pan-African institutions

“Africa

19. G8 Leaders met in Muskoka with the Heads of State or Government of Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia (as Chair of the NEPAD Heads of State and Government Orientation Committee), Malawi (as Chair of the African Union), Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa....Leaders reaffirmed their shared commitment to continued collaboration between G8 and African partners in support of African-led efforts to build a more stable, democratic and prosperous Africa, to advance economic and social development, and to promote the rule of law.”
 

Scope: 
Africa

Commitments in: Peace and security - Peace-building and peacekeeping

“International Peace and Security

27. We, the Leaders of the G8, remain deeply concerned about serious threats to global peace and security...

..28. We cannot be complacent about the grave threat posed to the security of present and future generations by the proliferation of nuclear weapons. We therefore welcome the outcome of the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, and will pursue the follow on actions it recommended by consensus. We call upon all states to do the same. We are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to creating conditions for a world without nuclear weapons, in accordance with the goals of the Treaty. We will pursue concrete disarmament efforts to this end. In this respect, we particularly welcome the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty signed by the Russian Federation and the United States. We call upon all other states, in particular those possessing nuclear weapons, to join these disarmament efforts, in order to promote international stability and undiminished security for all...

...30. We face a new era of threats from non-state actors, particularly terrorists, who seek to acquire weapons of mass destruction and related technology and materials. The consequences of failing to prevent this could be severe. We reaffirm our commitment to work together for our shared security, including fulfilment of the commitments we made at the Washington Nuclear Security Summit, especially to work cooperatively to secure all vulnerable nuclear material in four years.”
 

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Trade - International trade: market access, subsidies and aid for trade

“Trade and Investment

26. As a means of sustaining recovery from the global economic crisis, the G8 affirms its longstanding commitment to free and open markets. G8 members of the WTO renew their commitment to the successful conclusion of the Doha Development Agenda, building on the progress already made. We direct our representatives to engage in the spirit of give and take through all negotiating avenues with the goal of achieving the increased level of ambition necessary to facilitate an agreement, recognizing the changes in the global economy since the launch of the Agenda. We will continue to resist protectionist pressures, and to promote liberalization of trade and investment under the WTO, through the national reduction of barriers, as well as through bilateral and regional negotiations.”
 

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Agriculture - Food security

“16. Food security remains an urgent global development challenge, exacerbated by climate change, increasing global food demand, past underinvestment in the agricultural sector, and extreme price volatility which has strong damaging impacts on the most vulnerable. In 2009 in L’Aquila, we together with other countries and organizations adopted fundamental principles to enhance food security: use a comprehensive approach; invest in country-led plans; strengthen strategic coordination; leverage benefits of multilateral institutions; and deliver on sustained and accountable commitments. We launched the L’Aquila Food Security Initiative (AFSI) based on these principles and ultimately mobilized with US$22 billion for sustainable agriculture development over three years, while maintaining a strong commitment to ensure adequate emergency food aid. The initiative helped achieve a wide consensus and enabled progress to be made in reforming the Committee on Food Security and advancing the Global Partnership for Agricultural and Food Security. As of April 30, 2010, we have disbursed/allocated USD $6.5 billion and remain committed to disburse/allocate the full amount of our individual commitments by 2012. We are working actively to ensure a coordinated approach nationally, regionally and globally, while maintaining our focus on country-led initiatives. We are pleased with the launch of the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program hosted at the World Bank, which has $880 million in commitments, and other mutually complementary initiatives or mechanisms, such as the African Agriculture Fund. We underline the critical importance of accountability for ensuring that these collective commitments are met. We underline the key contribution of research to fight hunger and poverty, notably by increasing sustainable agricultural productivity and reiterate our support to the ongoing reform of the global research networks. Reduced malnutrition is a primary outcome of our Food Security Initiative and will contribute to improved maternal and child health.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Disaster risk reduction and humanitarian assistance - Disaster risk reduction and reconstruction

 “40...Recognizing the challenges faced by countries in the aftermath of natural disasters to provide security and basic services to civilians, we reaffirm our commitment to support Haiti and will work to strengthen existing international coordination mechanisms to improve the timeliness, effectiveness and coordination of the international response to such disasters and will continue to support the United Nations Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction. To that end, we will convene a meeting of experts to consider what further steps we might take.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - General health and health funding

“14. We will also focus efforts on training of medical personnel and on establishing stronger health innovation networks in Africa and other regions.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - Maternal health, reproductive health and infant mortality

“9. G8 members already contribute over US$4.1 billion annually in international development assistance for maternal, newborn and under-five child health (MNCH). Today, we, the Leaders of the G8, working with other Governments, several Foundations and other entities engaged in promoting maternal and child health internationally [1] endorse and launch the Muskoka Initiative, a comprehensive and integrated approach to accelerate progress towards MDGs 4 and 5 that will significantly reduce the number of maternal, newborn and under five child deaths in developing countries. The scope of the Muskoka Initiative is specified in Annex I. Our collective undertaking will support strengthened country-led national health systems in developing countries, in order to enable delivery on key interventions along the continuum of care, i.e., pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, childbirth, infancy and early childhood.

10. To this end, the G8 undertake to mobilize as of today $5.0 billion of additional funding for disbursement over the next five years [2]. Support from the G8 is catalytic. We make our commitments with the objective of generating a greater collective effort by bilateral and multilateral donors, developing countries and other stakeholders to accelerate progress on MDGs 4 and 5. We therefore welcome the decisions by other governments and foundations to join the Muskoka Initiative. The Governments of the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Republic of Korea, Spain and Switzerland, subject to their respective budgetary processes, and the Bill and Melinda Gates and UN Foundations have now or have recently committed to additional funding of $2.3 billion to be disbursed over the same period.

11. We fully anticipate that, over the period 2010-2015, subject to our respective budgetary processes, the Muskoka Initiative will mobilize significantly greater than $10 billion.

12. As a consequence of the commitments made today towards the Muskoka Initiative, this support, according to World Health Organization and World Bank estimates, will assist developing countries to: i) prevent 1.3 million deaths of children under five years of age; ii) prevent 64,000 maternal deaths; and iii) enable access to modern methods of family planning by an additional 12 million couples. These results will be achieved cumulatively between 2010-2015. We will track progress on delivering commitments through our accountability reporting, which, in 2011, will focus on health and food security. In line with the principle of mutual accountability, we expect these joint commitments will encourage developing countries to intensify their own efforts with regard to maternal and child health, leading to the saving of many more millions of lives of women, newborn and young children.

13. It is possible to build a broad coalition of the committed. We the partners to the Muskoka Initiative trust today’s launch will give added momentum to the UN-led process to develop a Joint Action Plan to Improve the Health of Women and Children, and make a key contribution towards the September 2010 UN High-Level Plenary Meeting on the MDGs. Given the interconnected nature of the Goals, we expect that our commitments will have positive impacts on the other MDGs.”
 

Scope: 
International

“Annex I

The G8 Muskoka Initiative: Maternal, Newborn and Under-Five Child Health[3]

Muskoka, Canada, June 26, 2010

...8. Global Targets:

a) Between 2010 and 2015, the G8 will work with multiple partners throughout the global community with the objective of achieving the targets set in 2001 for Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5:

i) reduce by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate;

ii) reduce by three-quarters, also between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio; and

iii) achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health.

b) Reaching these overall targets requires a major, sustained global effort including developed, emerging and developing countries, foundations, international agencies, non-governmental organizations, the private sector, and other constituencies.

9. Indicators: We are pleased that the WHO is working with relevant partners to identify a set of core indicators to measure progress in developing countries. These efforts should aim at harmonizing indicators and reporting requirements in order to reduce the burden of reporting on developing countries. As donors, we will work within these commonly agreed indicators. We will also support country reporting capacities and health information systems.

10. Methodology and Accountability: Recognizing the importance of transparency and accountability, we will track progress on delivering commitments through our accountability reporting which, in 2011, will focus on health and food security. We have also made public the methodology used to define our baseline and commitments.”
 

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - HIV/AIDS

“15. We reaffirm our commitment to come as close as possible to universal access to prevention, treatment, care and support with respect to HIV/AIDS. We will support country-led efforts to achieve this objective by making the third voluntary replenishment conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria in October 2010 a success. We encourage other national and private sector donors to provide financial support for the Global Fund. We commit to promote integration of HIV and sexual and reproductive health, rights and services within the broader context of strengthening health systems. G8 donors also remain steadfast in their support for polio eradication and remain committed to a polio-free world. We continue to support the control or elimination of high-burden Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs).”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Climate Change - Climate change technology and research

“23. While remaining committed to fighting climate change, we discussed the importance of ensuring that economies are climate resilient. We agreed that more research was needed to identify impacts at the global, regional, national and sub-national levels, and the options for adaptation, including through infrastructural and technological innovation. We particularly recognize the situation of the poorest and most vulnerable countries. We will share our national experiences and plans for adaptation, including through a conference on climate change adaptation in Russia in 2011.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Climate Change - Mitigation and low carbon growth

“Environmental Sustainability and Green Recovery

21. Among environmental issues, climate change remains top of mind. As we agreed in L’Aquila, we recognize the scientific view that the increase in global temperature should not exceed 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels. Achieving this goal requires deep cuts in global emissions. Because this global challenge can only be met by a global response, we reiterate our willingness to share with all countries the goal of achieving at least a 50% reduction of global emissions by 2050, recognizing that this implies that global emissions need to peak as soon as possible and decline thereafter. We will cooperate to that end. As part of this effort, we also support a goal of developed countries reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in aggregate by 80% or more by 2050, compared to 1990 or more recent years. Consistent with this ambitious long-term objective, we will undertake robust aggregate and individual mid-term reductions, taking into account that baselines may vary and that efforts need to be comparable. Similarly, major emerging economies need to undertake quantifiable actions to reduce emissions significantly below business-as-usual by a specified year.”
 

Scope: 
International

“24. To address climate change and increase energy security, we are committed to building low carbon and climate resilient economies, characterized by green growth and improved resource efficiency....We also recognize the role nuclear energy can play in addressing climate change and energy security concerns, acknowledging the international commitment to safety, security and safeguards for non-proliferation as prerequisites for its peaceful use. We also recognise the potential of bioenergy for sustainable development, climate change mitigation and energy security. We welcome the work of the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) and commit to facilitating swift adoption of voluntary sustainability criteria and indicators, as well as on capacity building activities.”

Scope: 
International